Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian Anticipation Guide

10. Stereotypes are never true.

I disagree. Stereotypes are a problem in our society, often spreading false or even racist/sexist/offensive information about a group of people, but that doesn’t mean they are never true. Stereotypes must be ‘based on something/someone’ or ‘come from an idea or concept’ when they are first created. Otherwise, they would have no logical connection to fact and would make no sense. For example, the stereotype of ‘All Canadians love Maple Syrup’ comes from the fact that Canada is well known for making maple syrup. Saying this stereotype is never true, however, is a paradox, as it creates another ‘true’ stereotype. This new stereotype would be, “All Canadian’s dislike maple syrup’, as saying that ‘All Canadians love Maple Syrup’ is never true leads people to believe the opposite, which perpetuates the problem of stereotypes. Another problem with saying that stereotypes are never true is that there will be people who ‘prove’ the stereotype. For example, there are some Canadians who like maple syrup, and some Canadians who dislike maple syrup. Saying that stereotypes are never true leads to a paradox of new stereotypes, and can be offensive to people that a stereotype is actually true for.

The problem with the statement, ‘Stereotypes are never true’, is the word never. It implies the idea that all stereotypes, for everyone and about everyone, are always false, which leads to the idea that the reality of stereotypes are is the opposite, which leads to more stereotypes. In addition, there will be people who fall on both sides of a stereotype, and people who fall in between ‘true’ and ‘false

I disagree. Stereotypes are a problem in our society, often spreading false or even racist/sexist/offensive information about a group of people, but that doesn’t mean they are never true. Stereotypes must be ‘based on something/someone’ or ‘come from an idea or concept’ when they are first created. Otherwise, they would have no logical connection to fact and would make no sense. For example, the stereotype of ‘All Canadians love Maple Syrup’ comes from the fact that Canada is well known for making maple syrup. Saying this stereotype is never true, however, is a paradox, as it creates another ‘true’ stereotype. This new stereotype would be, “All Canadian’s dislike maple syrup’, as saying that ‘All Canadians love Maple Syrup’ is never true leads people to believe the opposite, which perpetuates the problem of stereotypes. Another problem with saying that stereotypes are never true is that there will be people who ‘prove’ the stereotype. For example, there are some Canadians who like maple syrup, and some Canadians who dislike maple syrup. Saying that stereotypes are never true leads to a paradox of new stereotypes, and can be offensive to people that a stereotype is actually true for.

The problem with the statement, ‘Stereotypes are never true’, is the word never. It implies the idea that all stereotypes, for everyone and about everyone, are always false, which leads to the idea that the reality of stereotypes are is the opposite, which leads to more stereotypes. In addition, there will be people who fall on both sides of a stereotype, and people who fall in between ‘true’ and ‘false

Eminent Speech Plan

Character: Pen (used from childhood-present)

Story:

Opening: Describe Setting (Prairie Home)

  1. Effort from Ursula Le Guin & Pen
  2. Setting – Sunset, Sounds
  3. Writing for ‘newspaper’/backstory
  4. Time Skip

Rising Action: Inspiration to other Writers

  1. Writer’s Mentality (writing everyday)
  2. Publishing Struggle
  3. Inspiration for other authors (female & male)

Rising Action: Wizard of Earthsea/Opinion on Racism/‘Sexism’

  1. Colour main male character
  2. *About white male characters in books
  3. Impacts

Climax: Left Hand of Darkness/Opinion on Sexism & Shift/Genre/Ursula’s Popularity

  1. Genre Labeling (Sci Fi)
  2. Sexism (genderless, shift to female main characters of colour)
  3. Ursula Le Guin’s popularity (medals, impact, etc.)

Falling Action: Ursula Le Guin’s Impact on me (as a pen/writer)

  1. Through stories
  2. Describtion
  3. Personal Connections

Resolution: Conclusion/Recap

  1. Sexism
  2. Racism
  3. ’What happens next’